Weekend Thunderstorms Result in Damages Across Michigan

A series of severe thunderstorms made their way across southern and mid-Michigan this past weekend, dumping heavy amounts of rain and doing widespread wind damage. The strong winds were packing speeds in excess of 60 miles per hour in many areas which ripped roofs off homes and businesses and flattened entire garages and other structures.

Forecasters are warning residents of southern Michigan that the bad weather is not over yet. There is more stormy weather moving its way across the state that could dump very heavy rain through Monday to cause flooding problems in many areas. Forecasters warned that the heaviest rain will fall over an area from north of Grand Rapids through Mt. Pleasant and further northeast. Many of those areas could get two more inches of rain before it’s said and done which will inevitably cause some rivers and streams to overflow their banks.

The recent storms uprooted trees and damaged many Oakland and Macomb county homes. Many people thought the storms they heard this weekend were tornadoes as many reported the winds sounded like freight trains. Residents in many southeastern counties spent all day Sunday cleaning up the mess left behind which included entire trees which were down on vehicles and homes. There were some trees in the Lake Orion area that were completely uprooted and which ripped holes 6 to 7 feet deep. Clarkston also was hammered by the severe winds to prompt residents there to spend all day Sunday cleaning up.

Highs on Monday across lower Michigan could reach 70 degrees. However, by early Tuesday, temperatures will dip down to around 20 degrees which is plenty cold enough to snow. Yes, forecasters are telling winter-wearing residents of southern Michigan that it’s very possible wet snow will come down through early Tuesday. Up to five inches of snow could be on the ground by Tuesday morning across the southeastern part of the state. The good news in all of this is that the April snow should be gone by Thursday as temperatures will climb once again into the 50s and 60s.

On Monday morning, heavy rainfall prompted the National Weather Service to issue a flood warning for the Muskegon River below Croton Dam in Newaygo County. Emergency services in that county are urging residents that live along the river to evacuate. Monday morning the Muskegon River at Croton was at more than 11.5 feet. The flood stage is 9.0 feet and levels are expected to swell to reach 13 feet.

There are many worries of flooding along Michigan streams and rivers now as snow melt combined with heavy rainfall is pushing water levels well above normal in many waterways due to earlier rains and snow melt. And with this being April, there is bound to be many reports of serious flooding coming in from all across lower Michigan.

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